SC341 - Sub-carrier Modulation and Superchannels for Terabit-class DWDM Transceivers

Monday, 07 March
09:00 - 12:00

Short Course Level: Intermediate (comprehensive understanding of optical transport systems is necessary to follow course material)

Instructor:

Sander L. Jansen¹, Dirk van den Borne²; ¹ADVA Optical Networking, Germany; ²Juniper Networks, Germany

Short Course Description:

Over the last decade, advanced digital signal processing, ever-more complex modulation and record-high baud rates have been instrumental in pushing the limits of DWDM transport. In the meantime, 800G single-carrier transmission can be realized over short-reach distances, and 400G single-carrier starts to see deployments in long-haul transport. Next-generation 5 or 7 nm CMOS technology will enable terabit-class digital signal processing in a single ASIC, and higher sample rate DAC/ADCs can engineer a wider spectrum. At the same time, the tight integration between DSP and optics will enable baud rates well in excess of 100 Gbaud. 

What’s next? Standardization bodies are now starting to explore the fundamental technologies for Ethernet in the Terabit era, with the goal to standardize 1.6T Ethernet over the next coming years. What is the impact of Terabit Ethernet on DWDM transport systems? Over the last few years, optical transmission systems have approached the Nyquist limit through spectral engineering and the Shannon limit with complex constellations and stronger FEC codes. With those theoretical limits within grasp, Terabit Ethernet might need more than just single-carrier transmission. Will the use of Superchannels and/or optical sub-carriers become unavoidable to accommodate the ever higher client data rates?


This short course will focus in detail on how to realize terabit-class DWDM transport systems. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of Superchannels and spectral engineering with sub-carrier modulation or OFDM. We take a broad view, we explore all aspects of system design, including optical components, transmission impairments and the trade-off between optical performance and system complexity / cost.

Short Course Benefits:

This course should enable you to:

  • Describe how Ethernet standards might evolve beyond 400GE, and what the implications of such next-generation standards are for optical transport.
  • Understand the latest developments in optical and electronic components that will enable high-speed ADC/DAC and tighter electro-optical integration.
  • Understand the concept of optical Superchannels and provide a detailed overview of their advantages and disadvantages.
  • List different flavors of sub-carrier modulation and describe the relevant modulation and detection concepts such as orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM), sub-carrier multiplexing (SCM) and offset-QAM.
  • Be able to explain how sub-carrier modulation formats can be used to optimize the nonlinear tolerance in long-haul transmission systems by tuning the baud rate depending on the properties of a transmission link.
  • Describe the different sub-carrier modulation formats in the context of cost-effective short-reach systems and how to leverage the trade-off between optical performance and system complexity / cost.
  • Understand the state-of-the-art research in high-capacity transmission systems and explore the limits of technology in sub-carrier modulation for Terabit-class DWDM transceivers.
Short Course Audience:

This course is intended for engineers, researchers and technical managers who would like to gain a better understanding about the design trade-offs in Terabit-class transceivers and DWDM transport. We focus especially on the benefits of technologies such as sub-carrier modulation and Superchannels in the realization of next-generation optical transport systems. Apart from the theory and concepts, we will detail as well the most relevant applications of this technology in different segments of the optical transport network. Participants should have a comprehensive knowledge in the field of fiber-optic transmission systems as well as optical modulation and detection; no previous knowledge of sub-carrier modulation techniques is required.

Instructor Biography:

Sander L. Jansen is a product line manager at ADVA Optical in Munich, Germany, with focus on the access market. Prior to ADVA, Sander was a technical team lead of the optical components group at Nokia Siemens Networks, responsible for the evaluation and specification of new optical components.
He received his Ph.D. degree with highest honors in electronic engineering from Eindhoven University of Technology. Sander authored and co-authored 10+ patents, one book chapter and more than 100 refereed papers and conference contributions. He has received several awards including the Young Investigator award from the IEEE Photonics Society “for pioneering contributions in optical OFDM for fiber-optic transmission systems”.

Dirk van den Borne is with Juniper Networks, where he is a director of architecture and advises operators worldwide on their network evolution strategy, with a special focus on IP-optical integration. Prior to Juniper he was with Nokia Siemens Networks where he was responsible for the optical system performance of the DWDM transport products.

He received his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the Eindhoven University of Technology. He has spoken frequently at major industry events, authored and co-authored more than 100 peer-reviewed journal and conference contributions and holds several patents on optical communication. He is an associate editor for PTL and served on various technical program committees.