The Optical Networking and Communication
Conference & Exhibition

A Virtual Conference - Pacific Daylight Time (UTC-07:00)

Cloud Network Evolution Bandwidth Drivers

Thursday, 10 June 11:00 – 12:00

Session organized by IEEE Future Directions
 

Session Description:

This panel will review the main bandwidth drivers of the cloud network evolution. In many respects, the explosive growth of data‐center based, also known as “cloud” service delivery has been the biggest evolution in networking since the proliferation of the Internet, and the corresponding growth of Data Center Interconnect (DCI) has arguably been the most significant evolution in wireline transport since the transitions from TDM to IP/MPLS and WDM. Motivated by the initial cloud services, mostly related to virtual compute and storage, the traffic interconnecting data centers has grown more than any other network traffic type, and has already dominated the global fiber infrastructure. The economics of this growth has, in turn, motivated the building of dedicated global DCI networks, that scale to some of the most spectrally dense fiber deployments. It also motivated a new class of purpose‐built routing and optical transport systems which have pioneered the adoption of routers focusing on maximizing throughput (rather than routing scale), WDM systems with state‐of‐the‐art coherent transmission, as well as software/SDN innovations in automation, programmability, management abstraction, and control‐plane disaggregation, and the associated “open” transport architectures.

This panel will review the main bandwidth drivers of the cloud network evolution. In many respects, the explosive growth of data‐center based, also known as “cloud” service delivery has been the biggest evolution in networking since the proliferation of the Internet, and the corresponding growth of Data Center Interconnect (DCI) has arguably been the most significant evolution in wireline transport since the transitions from TDM to IP/MPLS and WDM. Motivated by the initial cloud services, mostly related to virtual compute and storage, the traffic interconnecting data centers has grown more than any other network traffic type, and has already dominated the global fiber infrastructure. The economics of this growth has, in turn, motivated the building of dedicated global DCI networks, that scale to some of the most spectrally dense fiber deployments. It also motivated a new class of purpose‐built routing and optical transport systems which have pioneered the adoption of routers focusing on maximizing throughput (rather than routing scale), WDM systems with state‐of‐the‐art coherent transmission, as well as software/SDN innovations in automation, programmability, management abstraction, and control‐plane disaggregation, and the associated “open” transport architectures.

Moderator:

Douglas N. Zuckerman, Perspecta Labs, USA

Douglas N. Zuckerman received his B.S., M.S. and Eng.Sc.D degrees from Columbia University and is an IEEE Life Fellow. His professional experience, mainly at Bell Labs and Telcordia Technologies, spans the operations, management and engineering of emerging communications technologies, networks and applications. His work heavily influenced early standards telecommunications network management. After retiring from Telcordia, as a consulting employee he contributed to optical networking standards through the Optical Internetworking Forum (OIF). Doug is a past IEEE Board member, was 2008-2009 IEEE Communications Society President, and held leadership positions in conferences, publications and membership development. Currently, he is on the IEEE Future Directions Committee.

Presenters:

Kathy Grise, IEEE Future Directions, USA

Kathy Grise, Senior Program Director - IEEE Future Directions, supports new technology initiatives, and is the IEEE staff program director for the Digital Reality Initiative, the IEEE Technology Navigator, Future Directions and Industry Advisory Board Committees, and manages the digital presence team for Future Directions. Previous initiatives included big data and cloud computing. Ms. Grise serves as the Technical Program Chair of the IEEE COMPSAC 2019 Symposium - Data Sciences, Analytics, & Technologies (DSAT). Prior to joining the IEEE staff, Ms. Grise held numerous positions at IBM, and most recently was a Senior Engineering Manager for Process Design Kit Enablement in the IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center.  Ms. Grise led the overall IT infrastructure implementation, and software development in support of semiconductor device modeling verification, packaging, and delivery; device measurement and characterization data collection and management, and automation for device modeling engineers. Ms. Grise is a graduate of Washington and Jefferson College, and an IEEE Senior member.
 

Mahmoud Daneshmand, Stevens Institute of Technology, USA

Dr. Daneshmand is Co-Founder and Professor of Department of Business Intelligence & Analytics; Professor of Department of Computer Science; and Academic Director of Network and Communications Management and Services M.S. program at Stevens Institute of Technology. He has more than 40 years of Industry & University experience as Executive Director, Assistant Chief Scientist, Professor, Researcher, Distinguished Member of Technical Staff, Technology Leader, Founding Chair of Department, and Dean of School at: Bell Laboratories; AT&T Shannon Labs–Research; University of California, Berkeley; University of Texas, Austin; New York University; Sharif University of Technology; University of Tehran; and Stevens Institute of Technology. Dr. Daneshmand received his Ph. D and M.S. degrees in Statistics from the University of California, Berkeley; M.S. and B.S. degrees in Mathematics from the University of Tehran. He is a Data Scientist, expert in Big Data Analytics, Artificial Intelligence, and Machine Learning with extensive industry experience including with the Bell Laboratories as well as the Info Lab of the AT&T Shannon Labs – Research. He has published more than 200 journal and conference papers; authored/co-authored three books. He is well recognized within the academia and industry and holds key leadership roles in IEEE Journal Publications, IEEE Major Conferences, Industry - IEEE Partnership, and IEEE Future Direction Initiatives.
 

Loukas Paraschis, Infinera, USA

Loukas Paraschis is senior director of cloud transport system engineering for Internet and content providers at Infinera. From 2007-2015, Loukas was cisco’s senior technology architect for wireline transport in global service provider, and from 2000-2006 technical leader in cisco optical networking and routing. He has (co)authored more than 100 peer‐reviewed publications, invited and tutorial presentations, book chapters, and 5 patents, has served in many IEEE and OSA leadership positions, including the OFC and JOCN steering committees, as JOCN associated editor, IEEE Photonics Society Distinguished Lecturer (2009), and is an OSA Fellow (2011). Loukas graduated from Stanford University (PhD 1999, MS 1998) where he worked at the Information Systems and Networking Research laboratories. He was born in Athens, Greece, where he completed his undergraduate studies.
 

Peter Winzer, Nubis Communications, USA

Peter J. Winzer received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Technical University of Vienna, Austria, and from 2000 to 2019 worked at Bell Labs in Holmdel, NJ, where he contributed to many high-speed optical transmission records from 10 Gbit/s to 1 Tbit/s per carrier, including the first field trial of live 100G video traffic. Following his involvement in estimating the optical fiber Shannon capacity, he investigated space-division multiplexing (SDM) to scale optical transport systems. In 2020 he founded the start-up Nubis Communications. Peter has widely published and patented and is actively involved with the IEEE Photonics Society and the Optical Society (OSA). A Highly Cited Researcher, Bell Labs Fellow, Fellow of the IEEE and the OSA, and elected member of the US National Academy of Engineering, Peter has received multiple recognitions for his work, including the John Tyndall Award and an honorary doctorate from the Technical University of Eindhoven.

Sponsored by: