The Optical Networking and Communication
Conference & Exhibition

Los Angeles Convention Center,
Los Angeles, California, USA

SC451 - Fiber-based devices and sensors

Sunday, 19 March
17:00 - 20:00

Short Course Level: Advanced Beginner

Instructor: Zuyuan He1, William Shroyer2; 1Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China, 2SageRider, Inc., USA
 

Short Course Description:

This short course is intended for an audience including not only researchers and engineers who are working on the development of optical fiber devices and sensors, but also those who want to use fiber sensors for monitoring and data collection in diverse areas.

The first half of the course will review at first the basic fiber-based devices, such as fiber Bragg gratings, long period gratings, optical fiber interferometers, and resonators, which form the bases of various fiber sensors.  Then typical “point” sensors including strain/temperature sensors, refractive index sensors (biomedical sensors), hydrophones, and gyroscopes will be addressed, and “multiplexed” fiber-optic sensors (sensor networks) be introduced.  The rest of the first half will focus on the principles of “distributed” fiber optic sensing.  Two fundamental points behind distributed fiber-optic sensing will be explained: 1) the schemes to locate the position or event to be measured, which comprise a series of tools as so called OTDR (time domain reflectometry), OFDR (optical frequency domain reflectometry), and OCDR (optical coherence domain reflectometry); 2) the mechanisms in optical fiber that work for sensing, including Rayleigh scattering, Brillouin scattering, and Raman scattering.  The key limiting factors and trade-offs in the performance of distributed fiber optic sensing will also be discussed.

As an example of the advances and benefits of applying distributed fiber optic sensing in industry, the second half of the training event introduces participants to the general application of distributed fiber optic sensing in the oil and gas industry with a primary focus on how DTS (distributed temperature sensing) and DAS (distributed acoustic sensing) are being used to monitor wellbore environments.  A basic understanding of the principles and benefits of DTS, DAS and surveillance monitoring technology in general will be included.  The course will address the sensor types, installation equipment and processes, and the procedures needed to install and operate a fiber-optic monitoring system.  It will explore various data collection techniques and how the data is being used to provide beneficial information for the development of oil and gas assets.

Short Course Benefits:

This course should enable you to:

  • Identify basic devices: fiber Bragg gratings, long period gratings, optical fiber interferometers, resonators.

  • Describe typical sensors based on above devices: strain/temperature sensors, refractive index sensors (biomedical sensors), hydrophones, gyroscopes

  • Explain multiplexed fiber-optic sensors and sensor networks: wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), time division multiplexing (TDM), frequency division multiplexing (FDM)

  • Summarize basic schemes behind space-resolved measurements in distributed fiber-optic sensors: time domain reflectometry (OTDR), optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR), optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR).

  • Measure the scatterings in optical fiber that work for sensing: Rayleigh scattering, Brillouin scattering, and Raman scattering

  • Discuss the trade-offs in performance: spatial resolution vs sensitivity, distance range vs dynamic range; define key limiting factors.

  • Identify the value and recognize the future trends of the applications of fiber sensors by discussing the general application of distributed fiber optic sensing in the oil and gas industry with a primary focus on how DTS (distributed temperature sensing) and DAS (distributed acoustic sensing) are being used to monitor wellbore environments.

Short Course Audience:

This advanced-beginner course is intended for an audience including not only researchers and engineers working on the development of optical fiber devices and sensors, but also those trying to apply fiber sensors in diverse areas. Some basic knowledge of optics and physics will help in better understanding the course.

Instructor Biography:

Zuyuan He received his Ph.D. degree in Optoelectronics from the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, in 1999 before becoming a Research Associate of the university working on the measurement and characterization of fiber optic components and systems and the development of fiber optic sensors.  In 2001, he joined CIENA Corporation, Maryland, USA, as a Lead Engineer leading the optical testing and optical process development group.  He returned to the University of Tokyo as a Lecturer in 2003, and became an Associate Professor in 2005 and a full Professor in 2010.  He is now a Chair Professor and the Director of the State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.  His current research interests include optical fiber sensors, specialty optical fibers, and optical interconnects.

William Shroyer is Fiber Optic Product Line Manager at SageRider, Inc., has worked in the practical application of fiber optic sensing systems in the oil and gas industry since 1998.  During this time, he has designed and executed numerous fiber optic and conventional monitoring installations in a wide variety of applications ranging from complex offshore installations to shallow steam flood fiber deployments.  Over the last 16 years, William has served in Field and Project Engineering roles for 2 major service companies and provided Project Management consultation for a major Global Operator. William has a degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of East Carolina and is a Certified Fiber Optic Technician (CFOT).

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